Consider: Enemies of Liberty

These are the spurs taken from the corpse of Julio Cardenas.

Cardenas was a Captain in Pancho Villa’s army and had taken part in the Battle of Columbus, New Mexico, in which 18 Americans were killed.

Lt. George S. Patton killed Cardenas with a single-action Colt…then strapped the corpse to the hood of his car.  

This is how Americans in the past have dealt with Enemies of Liberty.

Think about that…

…and consider also how Patton was treated by Washington DC for his desire to take Moscow, and how the General died.

Here is General Patton on the Russians: The difficulty in understanding the Russians is that we do not take cognizance of the fact that he is not a European, but an Asiatic, and therefore thinks deviously. We can no more understand a Russian than a Chinaman or a Japanese, and from what I have seen of them, I have no particular desire to understand them, except to ascertain how much lead or iron it takes to kill them. In addition to his other Asiatic characteristics, the Russian have no regard for human life and is an all out son of bitch, barbarian, and chronic drunk.

Had we only listened to a man who knew how to deal with our enemies.

Yet Washington DC was eager to protect the Russians…why?

I think we understand, now.

Kerodin
III

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4 thoughts on “Consider: Enemies of Liberty

  1. Not all of Patton's enemies were enemies of liberty.

    I once had a lot of respect for him. Then I learned about the “bonus Army March”.

    That oathbreaker used cavalry, infantry, bayonets, and chemical weapons on United states' citizens -WW1 vets, no less- on United states' soil.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonus_Army#U.S._Army_intervention

    http://www.historynet.com/the-bonus-army-war-in-washington.htm

    I would agree though that the Russian is generally Asiatic as opposed to European, though I'm no expert on such things.

    Patton was a soldier who killed the enemies his nation defined for him, whether Mexican bandits, Germans, or hungry American WW1 vets.

    He knew how to deal with these enemies, that is true.

    Whoever his government told him they were.

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  2. I know all about the Bonus Army bit of our history, and I did not address it because it was not relevant to my points. You will also note that I made no mention of the character of Patton, only his methodology.

    Since AP and Tam seem to want me to discuss the Bonus Army event: It sucks. We have many “It sucks” moments in our history when men and women have done things that, in hindsight, probably would have been better handled in different manners.

    The military is a killing force, and it should never be put into any situation that requires less-than-lethal methodology. It is not fair to those in the military. Yet our politicians do it all the time.

    I will also note that a crowd of up to 43,000 people was moved from the city with one death, a baby died likely due to the gas.

    It could have been a slaughter, and it was not.

    Do I approve of the use of the military in this situation? No. Am I a realist enough to understand that our military will follow most orders that come from the President? Yes.

    Here is one more bit of reality that I hope “Patriots” and “Constitutionalists” can get their heads around: What is coming our way in this country is going to have thousands, maybe hundreds of thousands, of “It Sucks” moments that we will regret at the end of the day.

    But without serious Warriors and Sons-of-Bitches in FreeFor who are willing to get the ugly jobs done for the greater good, the republic will end, Liberty will end, and every child alive today will be enslaved to a far greater extent that are we.

    By any means necessary had better damned well mean something, or we lose.

    Kerodin
    III

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  3. AP, re-read your excellent pieces on “Moral High Ground” and how the desire to be there during “difficult” times is folly. I hear you but also think Patton, as Kerodin points out, made the best of a very bad situation with minimal cost. Plus, if he had refused the order his dead career (and it would have died right there and then) wouldn't have developed to where it inspires us today.

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